explore-blog
In the end all books are written for your friends. The problem after writing One Hundred Years of Solitude was that now I no longer know whom of the millions of readers I am writing for; this upsets and inhibits me. It’s like a million eyes are looking at you and you don’t really know what they think.
Gabriel García Márquez (March 6, 1927 – April 17, 2014) in this altogether excellent 1981 Paris Review interview, a fine manifestation of the magazine’s mastery of the art of the interview. (via explore-blog)
hmhbooks
writersflow:

humansofnewyork:

"You want to photograph me eating chicken?""Yep.""Well, if I let you, I need you to help me deliver a message.""What’s that?""I work at this library. And before that, I was coming here for twenty years. It’s my favorite place in the world. As many people know, the main reading room of this library is supported by seven floors of books, which contain one of the greatest research collections in the world. Recently, the library administration has decided to rip out this collection, send the books to New Jersey, and use the space for a lending library. As part of the consolidation, they are going to close down the Mid-Manhattan Library Branch as well as the Science, Industry, and Business Library. When everything is finished, one of the greatest research libraries in the world will become a glorified internet cafe. Now read that back to me."

Save the Libraries

writersflow:

humansofnewyork:

"You want to photograph me eating chicken?"
"Yep."
"Well, if I let you, I need you to help me deliver a message."
"What’s that?"
"I work at this library. And before that, I was coming here for twenty years. It’s my favorite place in the world. As many people know, the main reading room of this library is supported by seven floors of books, which contain one of the greatest research collections in the world. Recently, the library administration has decided to rip out this collection, send the books to New Jersey, and use the space for a lending library. As part of the consolidation, they are going to close down the Mid-Manhattan Library Branch as well as the Science, Industry, and Business Library. When everything is finished, one of the greatest research libraries in the world will become a glorified internet cafe. Now read that back to me."

Save the Libraries

Do what You Love, Love What You Do, dammit.

"Do What You Love".

It’s been my mantra to my children, and myself, for as long as any of us care to remember.  The other day, my daughter, who, along with her siblings, is the embodiment of this notion, tagged me on an article that slammed the idea of doing what you love as elitist.  

*sigh*  

Another lost and bitter soul, the author utterly misses the point of “Do What You Love” and “Love What You Do”.  Both are about setting positive attitudes about a life that’s most likely going to be difficult and heartbreaking.

"Do What You Love" is about pursuing a dream relentlessly, it’s about passion.  Its not about making money or careers - its about being true and honest about the things that really drive you.  It’s about not giving in and not giving up.  Sure, we all have to do things in life we don’t want to do.  Whether it’s going to a crappy job every day to support your family, or changing a dirty diaper, or reading an inane internet article, life is full of difficult and unpleasant tasks.  But whatever happens, don’t give up on the dream.  Do What You Love!  The only alternative is to not.

"Love What You Do", on the other hand, is all about attitude.  You may not like your job, but by God, be the best at it.  It’s a bit motivation, and a bit persuasion.  Aristotle called it "Excellence", when we repeatedly do something to the best of our ability.  Find the excellence and glory in whatever you do.  It’s not about brainwashing yourself into believing that writing angry internet articles matters; it’s about making the conscious decision to work every day at being the best at whatever you do.  Decide to Love What You Do.  Choose excellence.

explore-blog
Writer’s block is a phony, made up, BS excuse for not doing your work.

Take it from Jerry Seinfeld. Other famous creators have articulated the same sentiment:

E.B. White: “A writer who waits for ideal conditions under which to work will die without putting a word on paper.”

Chuck Close: “Inspiration is for amateurs — the rest of us just show up and get to work.”

Tchaikovsky: “A self-respecting artist must not fold his hands on the pretext that he is not in the mood.”

Isabel Allende: “Show up, show up, show up, and after a while the muse shows up, too.”

Samuel Johnson: “Composition is for the most part an effort of slow diligence and steady perseverance, to which the mind is dragged by necessity or resolution.”

Still, should you find yourself creatively blocked, here’s some help.

(via explore-blog)