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explore-blog:

Amelia Earhart deep-see diving off Block Island, 07/25/1929. This photograph, part of the series Photographic File of the Paris Bureau of the New York Times, was taken a day after Earhart’s thirty-second birthday and about 18 months before she penned her bold letter on marriage to her future husband.
Complement with Earhart on drive, education, and human nature.
(via Today’s Document)

explore-blog:

Amelia Earhart deep-see diving off Block Island, 07/25/1929. This photograph, part of the series Photographic File of the Paris Bureau of the New York Times, was taken a day after Earhart’s thirty-second birthday and about 18 months before she penned her bold letter on marriage to her future husband.

Complement with Earhart on drive, education, and human nature.

(via Today’s Document)

explore-blog
[The modern Western economist] is used to measuring the “standard of living” by the amount of annual consumption, assuming all the time that a man who consumes more is “better off” than a man who consumes less. A Buddhist economist would consider this approach excessively irrational: since consumption is merely a means to human well-being, the aim should be to obtain the maximum of well-being with the minimum of consumption.
Buddhist Economics – fantastic, timely read from 1973 (via explore-blog)